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Around the Web: A Month in Summary

A recent article from Divestopedia entitled “7 Fundamentals to Due Diligence You Need to Know” explains the due diligence process and what it means regarding sellers and buyers and their roles in the process.

Whether a company is being sold or it is merging with another company, it is standard practice to go through the due diligence process. Therefore, they should be aware of all the factors involved with the due diligence process. The fundamentals of due diligence can be broken into 7 categories:

  1. Historic and Projected Financial Information
  2. Technology Developments and Intellectual Property
  3. Customers and Revenue Streams
  4. Contract Agreements and Insurance
  5. Key Staff and Management
  6. Legal and Compliance
  7. Tax Issues

In each of these 7 critical areas, the buyer and the seller each have to do their part in order to see the deal make it to the finish line. The seller has to be open and honest with the attorneys, their advisory team and the potential buyer; and the buyer has to be thorough in examining and combing through all of the information provided.

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A recent article from NuWire Investor entitled “How to Find the Right Broker to Sell your Business” explains the most important characteristics a seller should be looking for in a business broker when deciding who to hire.

When it comes to hiring a business broker to sell your business, you want to ask the following questions to ensure that you’re choosing a broker who will improve your experience and increase the chances of selling your business:

  • What do they know about major players, important trends, insider terminology or future industry projections? It’s important that a business broker is well acquainted with and well connected in your specific industry.
  • What have they sold before, and what is their success ratio? Beware of a business broker who isn’t transparent with you on these things.
  • How do they charge for their services and when are they expecting to be paid? A good business broker will set these expectations up front, very clearly in the agreement between the seller and broker. Typical commissions are between 8 and 12%, paid after the business is sold.
  • How is the business broker planning to market your business? As a buyer, you want to make sure that the broker you choose to work with has plans to engage their network and actively seek out connections who would be interested in your business.

When it comes to choosing a business broker to work with, who you choose to handle the sale of your business matters tremendously. It is better to take your time and find someone who makes you feel comfortable and has the proper knowledge and connections than it is to miss out on a favorable deal.

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A recent article from Inc.com entitled “Selling a Business in 2019: Three Important Things to Keep in Mind” discusses the factors that sellers should consider when developing their exit plan, according to small business experts.

While sales prices are rising and 60 percent of owners are confident that they would receive a favorable sales price if they sold their business today, it’s understandable that some owners would be tempted to jump into a sale. With the baby boomer generation fueling the market at a rate that is faster than ever, and GDP expecting to slow its pace as we approach 2020, entering the market now becomes even more enticing. However, experts warn sellers not to prematurely jump into a deal and to have a clear and well-thought-out exit strategy to guarantee an optimal sales price and a smooth sale.

Two critical parts of a well-thought-out exit strategy are investing in your business and preparing your financials. Once you’ve made the decision to sell your business, experts suggest determining any key items that will either motivate or deter a buyer from choosing your business over the other businesses on the market. Use these key items to invest in your business and make it more appealing on the market. 2019 is expected to bring multiple increases in the overhead expenses associated with running a business. When preparing your business for sale, make sure you address these concerns and clean up your financials. Be prepared to have a good explanation for any revenue declines.

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A recent article from Entrepreneur.com entitled “3 Reasons Buying a Franchise Might Be Better Than Starting Your Own Business” explains how purchasing a franchise provides exceptional support and guidance when it comes to getting your business up and running. There are 3 key advantages to purchasing a franchise:

  1. Carrying the name of an already established business makes it easier to gain new business from startup.
  2. Cost Benefits: When purchasing a franchise you have to pay a franchise fee, which may increase your initial costs, but it gives you access to many resources that can help your business turn a profit faster than if you were to start up a business from scratch.
  3. The ability to sell at a higher price when it comes time to exit: A well-known brand and business operations consistency combined with a detailed transition manual provided by the franchisor allows for a smoother transition and a higher chance of profitability for the buyer.

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A recent article from Divestopedia entitled “How Do I Attract a High Multiple for My Business? – The Sales Process” explains how the sales process impacts a company valuation.

While you cannot transform an average business into a high multiple business, there are a few guidelines you can follow to encourage a higher enterprise value at the closing date. The first of these guidelines is that the ideal time to sell is when there are positive trends in revenue and earnings. A positive trend means that there has been consistent growth over the past two years (keyword: consistent) and that there are future prospects on the horizon.

The second important factor in the sales process is who you’re selling to. It’s crucial to not only thoroughly screen your buyers, but to keep as many options open as long as possible. When there are multiple buyers interested, you have leverage as the seller.

The third and final piece affecting the end value of your business in the sales process is why you’re selling it. Who you choose to sell the business to and how long you remain after the sale is highly dependent upon this answer.

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Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

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